Archive for January, 2013


First Draft Fall 2014 Syllabus

Hi!

I’m Kenton Anderson and I’m your guide for this semester’s Oral Communication course here at Buffalo State.  I look forward to meeting each of you and finding out your goals and dreams as they pertain to communication of all kinds. This semester, we’ll focus on Performing Public Speaking, but we’ll also touch on Theory, Self-Talk (Intrapersonal Communication), Dyadic and Small Group Interaction (Interpersonal Communication), Interviewing and Research skills. We’ll even work on increasing your comfort levels in each of these areas, reducing or “transmuting” apprehension into accomplishment. I wish each of you the joy of accomplishing your finest work and getting closer to your life’s richest potential. See you in class!

Advertisements

Here are some class materials you should read and/or printout. Printing them out is not required this semester, but reading them is.

partner-introduction1

speech-introduction-and-conclusion-exercise-spg-20061

This is the direct link to the Robert McCroskey Communication Apprehension Survey. Please go the the link, fill out the survey and have the site send me your results today. To send the results, at the end of the survey, a window will appear asking for your name & email and my name & email: (Prof Anderson; kba2@buffalo.edu).
Thank you!
KBA
http://www.wadsworth.com/communication_d/templates/student_resources/053456223X_hamilton/survey/prca/main_frame.htm

Please send me an email letting me know when you have completed all four parts of the survey. Thanks!

Click Here to take survey

Click Here to take survey

Click Here to take survey

Click Here to take survey

You may find this website with an extensive list of “How To” topics useful to show you a range of topics.
http://www.sanjuan.edu/webpages/mikeberry/speech.cfm?subpage=66000

Several students have asked me for some exercises to develop the diaphragmatic action of your breathing and voice for relaxation and volume. I found some sites on youtube that are rather nice. I include them below. Try them out at home in private and we’ll try some in class when you’ve had a chance to see them.

1. Eric Arceneaux, Voice Coach and Performer:

A.

B.

C.

D.

E.

2.  Some head and neck exercises for relaxing before your speech, from a variety of performance coaches.

A.

B.

C.

D.

E.

Who are your favorite speakers? Send me your links (or post them here) and, whenever possible and appropriate, we’ll post them for our class to respond to and critique. (Note: If posted, speeches will be viewable by all my classes.)

Here is a full-length quiz study guide for the first four chapters. Any or all these items may be covered on the in-class quiz this Wednesday. The quizzes will be 10 Multiple Choice questions. NOTE: Thank you in advance for being on time for class. Quizzes begin promptly the start of class and are scheduled to last no more than 20 minutes. We will continue class lecture and discussion after the quiz. Good luck!

quiz-one-study-guide

Here are some informative “How-To” speeches with no outside sources.

http://www2.uttyler.edu/meidenmuller/speechfundamentals/StudentWork/breannmcilhennydemonstrationspeech.htm

This week, you will create four speech topics. You will need two different types of informative topics: (one each of two of these–“How To”, Person, Object, Event, or Concept” topics), a Debate Proposition, and a Personally Important Persuasion “Issue” topic. Some of these may become the speeches you do in class. Open the attached documents below, print off and do the topic exercise. After filling in the boxes in that assignment with ideas, take ideas from the boxes and your life experiences or other readings and create a topic for each of the four topic types listed above. You may need to sneak a peek ahead in the book to see what such topics could be.

Try to choose “How to Do” topics that you are good at doing. Choose “Informative Topics about Persons, Things, Concepts, Natural Phenomena,or Events” that you are interested in researching and sharing. Choose “Persuasion Issues,” “Problems,” “Plans and Policies” and “Positions/Propositions”  you are passionate about, but which are unique and fresh for me and your audience. Tip:  It’s usually preferable to stay away from persuasion topics that are more than 20 years old, such as abortion, capital punishment or religion.

This assignment should be typed, including your name and date at the top, with the list of four kinds of topics labeled as described in quotation marks above. Each topic should be followed by a General Purpose, Specific Purpose, and a Central idea, clearly and separately labeled.

The other attachments here below the topic exercise will help you understand these four requirements. You must read all documents, but you only need to print off the remaining ones that are of use to you.

topic-selection-brainstorming-exercise1

possible-topics-for a “How to Do” Speech

specific-purpose-and-central-idea info sheet